Do you have a bad habit of spending savings as quickly as you're topping them up? Don't worry - you're not alone! With cards, contactless payments and the rise of digital wallets (like Apple Pay for example), we're all finding it easier to dip into our various accounts. After all, one little coffee or a drive-through McDonalds won't hurt, will it? Well, actually - it will. If you've got a savings account, it might be worth really considering when you should and shouldn't be dipping into it...

Don't dip into your savings for...

New clothing. Unless you're really desperate, that ASOS order or couple of t-shirts in the supermarket basket shouldn't be paid for using your savings card. Instead, use your current account, and if you can't afford to, wait until next month.

Meals out. We know: lunch with friends for proper streak and chips is hard to resist, but meals out are precisely the kind of thing you shouldn't use your savings for. Why? Well, there's nothing to show for your spending! If you eat out often, take out cash from your current account and make it last, or apportion yourself a monthly budget for the odd date night.

Your weekly needs. Does the car need to be filled with fuel? Is the fridge looking a little bare? Again, these aren't things to pay for using your savings. Instead, use your account dedicated specifically to outgoings (such as your big bills, rent, mortgage or utilities). If you're struggling to pay for the basics, consider saving a little less every month. You'll probably save more in the long run as you won't be frequently dipping into your savings!

Holidays. Doubtless you deserve one, but you won't feel good for blowing thousands on a family holiday. Set up a separate savings pot for holidays and fun activities: you'll feel safe and secure when you return to England knowing your life savings haven't been touched.

Feel free to dip into your savings account for...


Expensive car repairs. If your car is what gets you and your family to work and school every day, it's a necessity that needs paying for. So long as you can afford it and the car is valued above the cost of the work it needs doing, use your savings to pay for expensive repairs.

House repairs (and possibly renovations). Boiler broken down? Roof fallen in? Side wall collapsing? Your home is an important asset to guard, so use your savings wisely by carrying out essential repairs when you can afford to. You could also consider using your savings to carry out renovations and extensions, as (if done right) they'll add value to your home. Just make sure you've calculated your figures properly first!

Redundancy and unemployment. Being out of work is tough - if you need to use your savings to keep your things ticking over until you find something new, do so. Remember you can claim benefits and support from the government if you're seeking work or unable to work. Of course, if you're in a real tight spot, you could consider one of our loans to tide you over. Here's how it works.